In Defense of Animals
IDA General Wrapper Top
IDA Share Tell-A-Friend please donate button grey red

Animal News Weekly - August 20, 2015


South Korea: Stop Torturing Dogs for Dinner! 

In Defense of Animals

Another year of Boknal Days "celebrations" have come to a close in South Korea. Yet again, these "celebrations" have claimed thousands of dogs who were all beaten, tortured, brutally killed and then eaten.

Even more distressing is the reality that such atrocities persist throughout the year in South Korea. One infamous market, Seongnam Moran Market, keeps dogs alive, crammed in cages, waiting to be selected: for dinner.

The daily scene at Seongnam Moran Market is as unbelievable as it is tragic. Our very own Marilyn Kroplick, IDA President, went to see firsthand the horrors that await all these dogs and joined our friends at Coexistence of Animal Rights on Earth (CARE) in protest. Here is her experience as written in an email to staff:

"The pungent smells of dog death are affecting my sleep.

I have just returned from CARE’s protest at Seongnam Moran Market - a place notorious for confining, slaughtering, and selling body parts of dogs for meat...."

Click here to read more and to take action.


End Cruel Trapping on
National Wildlife Refuges

In Defense of Animals

Trapping is allowed on more than half of our nation’s 563 wildlife refuges comprising about 150 million acres. Every year, more refuges are opened up to the archaic practice of trapping and killing wild animals for recreation and profit (fur), although polls have shown that 79% of Americans believe trapping on National Wildlife Refuges should be prohibited, while 88% believe wildlife and habitat preservation should be the highest priority of the refuge system.

A bill to prohibit the use of body-gripping traps, the Refuge from Cruel Trapping Act (H.R. 2016/S. 1081) has been introduced in both the US House of Representatives and the Senate by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ).

Body-gripping traps—steel-jaw foothold traps, cable snares and Conibear traps---are archaic devices that can cause painful injuries, such as fractures, dislocation, laceration, hemorrhage, and even forced amputations when the trapped animal chews off his or her own limb to escape the trap. Animals often linger in traps and snares for several days while struggling with horrific pain, trauma and a prolonged and painful death. Trapped animals still alive by the time the trapper returns, will be clubbed, strangled, shot or stomped to death, or drowned.

Wildlife refuges should be just that – safe havens for all wild animals. Also, visitors should not have to worry about their own safety or that of their family members, including children and animal companions nor should they have to worry about coming across an injured or dead animal in a trap.

Click here to take action.


Animal Activist Mentor Line Extends Hours

In Defense of Animals

Thanks to everyone who returned our recent Activist Survey! We listened to your feedback and are now extending our operating hours to include weekdays. On Monday, August 24th, we will extend our open hours to include Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday afternoons/evenings as well as Saturday mornings. For details, visit: www.idausa.org/mentor.

If you haven't sent us your feedback, we would love to hear from you! To complete the Activist Survey, please click here.

To receive live updates about our Animal Activist support services, please join our ongoing Facebook event page.

At IDA, we believe that every single activist is needed to bring about animal liberation. This service is part of our Sustainable Activism Campaign providing support and resources for animal activists via video tips, webinars, online gatherings, retreats, and blogs to ensure that activists can help animals for the long haul.

For upcoming Sustainable Activism events, visit: www.idausa.org/events.

To learn more about our Sustainable Activism Campaign, visit: www.idausa.org/sustainableactivism.


Guardian Campaign Update

In Defense of Animals

For those of you who were able to attend the recently held National Animal Rights Conference, of which IDA was a major sponsor,  we hope you enjoyed yourselves and were energized by the camaraderie you experienced.  You may have noticed that we created a new Guardian Campaign flyer for people who were new to the campaign, and possibly to the animal rights  movement as well.

If you were not able to attend, and have not as yet seen the flyer, we have posted a link to it here.  The flyer was designed to  succinctly introduce the purpose, benefits and power of the Guardian Campaign. We would very much appreciate it if you would share your thoughts  with us on the effectiveness of the  flyer and ideas on how you feel it might be improved before its next foray into the world.   Should you wish to express your opinions, get  additional copies, inquire about volunteer opportunities connected to the campaign, or share your ideas about the Guardian Campaign in general,  please contact Dr. Katz directly at emk@idausa.org.  We thank you in advance for your input and suggestions.

We also want to thank you for all you have done for IDA and our animal friends over the years; for bringing kindness, consideration, caring  and compassion to a world in great need of it.

See more here.


Meet Bouboule!

In Defense of Animals

Eighteen-year-old Bouboule, like all the other chimpanzees at Sanaga-Yong Rescue Center in Cameroon’s Mbargue Forest, was orphaned as an infant by poachers who killed his family to supply the illegal, but thriving, commercial bushmeat trade.  He has lived at Sanaga-Yong Center since 2000 when IDA-Africa found him tied by his waist behind a village hut with a pig, his only friend.

Miserable with scabies, the itchiest skin disease known to humans or chimpanzees, and desperate for a loving touch, he soon passed his skin disease to all his human caregivers at the Rescue Center.  Fortunately, with good treatment, everyone soon recovered, and in 2002, Bouboule was adopted by elder female chimpanzee Dorothy.

He briefly became the alpha male of his group in 2010, but lacked the maturity and leadership skills he would have needed to keep the job. Today he shares a 20-acre forested enclosure with 19 other chimpanzees in his social group, is popular with the females and mostly avoids conflict with the other males.  He is of the subspecies Pan troglodytes ellioti, the most endangered subspecies of chimpanzee in Africa.


Don't Let Elephants Die for Ivory
Save the Lives of Dogs, Cats,
and Rabbits in Shelters 

All these styles are 100% organic cotton, USA made, and sweatshop free.

In Defense of Animals

Women's

Unisex/Men's

In Defense of Animals

Women's

Unisex/Men's

In Defense of Animals

Women's

Unisex/Men's

In Defense of Animals

Women's

Unisex/Men's

Thank you for speaking up and
for supporting our work.